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“We’re preserving our own environment, but contaminating the rest of the world.”

Ever wonder what happens to your electronics when you recycle them? I, like everyone else, thought we were helping the Earth by recycling these products. But in actuality, we’re contributing to a global trade in electronic trash that endangers workers and pollutes the environment overseas. In fact, here is the USA 50 to 80 percent of the 300,000 to 400,000 tons of electronics collected for recycling each year ends up overseas. Workers in countries such as China, India and Nigeria then use hammers, gas burners and their bare hands to extract metals, glass and other recyclables, exposing themselves and the environment to a tons of toxic chemicals. (Note: True, this “cracking open with bare hands” does no happen in ALL countries that import e-waste, but more than zero means there’s a problem.)

Here’s the link to the actual article on E-waste:
Destination of ‘recycled’ electronics may surprise you – CNN.com

And learn how to tell when to pull the plug on your electronics, or just get it repaired:
When Good Electronics Go Bad – Yahoo.com

A mon avis, all electronics should be owned forever by the very companies who manufacture them. When the consumer is finished with the product, they return it to the manufacturer who recycles/reuses the parts. Manufacturers will have to take this into consideration in their design process, thereby saving money and resources for themselves, passing on that savings to their customers, and being responsible, in the long run, for not shipping their “mess” to someone else to fix while their health is in danger.

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http://inhabitat.com/2007/01/11/reverse-graffiti/#more-2426

You gotta love that. Green graffiti. But of course, now it’s a crime in some places. Governments take all the fun out of life :)

Someone made a comment on that article that really resonated with me:

“I have come to the conclusion that if we can be completely bombarded with images and words through advertising- then we might as well say what we want as well. Hearing the voice of the public is important and keeps a community alive.”

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=3379017

There’s a more specific article from NPR about Moose (which is my hermit crab’s name! :) )

I think that street art should be legalized, meaning makeing public property really public property – i.e. not tagging someone’s car, but abandoned buildings, sidewalks, your own house, other people’s houses if they allow, highways, overpasses, any form of concrete barrier! Also, no more hassling for street music and street performance. Communities should encourage free art for the public and not only for those who can afford it. (Check this out- It’s from the Defenestrator, an anarchist newspaper from Philly http://www.defenestrator.org/singing_ban How can this be happening? People arrested for singing?!) I also think that drugs should not necessarily be legalized (this allows some businesses to capitalize) but have a minimal involvement stance on the use of plants that people use as drugs, except when there is a massive drug deal going on or someone has over a certain amount (like the way they handle it in the Netherlands!) Our government should treat drug addiction as a medical problem first and not a misdemeanor. Many people don’t get treatment because they are afraid of getting arrested-hello! My mom worked in the city as a first grade teacher. More than half her kid’s parents were on drugs. Lastly, abortion must remain legal, but we should develop better, less invasive forms of contraceptives, make it inexpensive/free and easily accessible to those who need it. That would just be the start, but ya know.